Safety Seminar about Incident Investigation

The Incident Cause Assessment Methodology (ICAM) is now globally recognised as a peak incident investigation methodology and is widely used in industry for safety related incidents. Many concepts such as the Swiss Cheese Model, Active and Latent Failures etc. have now become part of the safety vocabulary of incident investigation. Numerous industries and many major construction and resources clients require their supervisors, managers and safety officers to be competent in using this methodology for incident investigations.

CTC’s latest Seminar in the Safety Series focused on Incident Investigation using ICAM methodology. Guest speaker Simon Phillips, Managing Director of CTC tenant OHSA is an ICAM expert having conducted many investigations using the methodology across a range of industries both in Australia and overseas.

 

Simon started his presentation by describing James Reason’s Swiss Cheese model of accident causation. In the Swiss Cheese model, an organisation’s defences against failure are modelled as a series of barriers, represented as slices of the cheese. The holes in the cheese slices represent individual weaknesses in individual parts of the system, and are continually varying in size and position in all slices. The system as a whole produces failures when holes in all of the slices momentarily align, permitting “a trajectory of accident opportunity”, so that a hazard passes through holes in all of the defences, leading to an accident.

Reason hypothesized that most accidents can be traced to one or more of four levels of failure:

  • Organisational influences,
  • Unsafe supervision,
  • Preconditions for unsafe acts, and
  • The unsafe acts themselves.

In his presentation, Simon summarised the ICAM process as follows:

  • Establish the facts.
  • Identify contributing factors and latent hazards.
  • Review the adequacy of existing controls and procedures.
  • Report the findings.
  • Recommend corrective actions which can reduce risk and prevent recurrence.
  • Detect organisational factors than can be analysed to identify specific or recurring problems.
  • Identify key learnings for distribution.

The ICAM investigation process focuses on:

  • Data collection using the PEEPO tool.
  • Data analysis.
  • Development recommendations using the Hierarchy of control.
  • Key learnings presented in an ICAM Investigation Report.

ICAM seeks to look further and focuses on:

  • Immediate causes
  • Contributing factors
  • Underlying causes

The following six steps are recommended when facilitating incident analysis:

The ICAM report should include the following:

  • Incident Description
  • Key Findings
  • Conclusion and Observations
  • Recommendations
  • Significant Learnings
  • Appendices
  • ICAM Analysis
  • Corrective Action
  • Report Sign Off

The Seminar offered only a very brief overview of the ICAM methodology. However, OHSA conducts a 2-day ICAM Training Course here at CTC.  To find out more about this course, visit their website.


Safety Series Seminar focuses on Preventing Workplace Injuries

The latest in CTC’s Safety Series Seminars was held on Wednesday, 24th August. The focus for this seminar was to highlight how to avoid workplace injuries and how WorkCover Queensland can work with employers to reduce the impact on injured staff.

The seminar coincided with Tradies National Health Month which aims to raise awareness of the risks posed to those who work in trade occupations. Tradies National Health Month is an initiative of the Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) and we were fortunate to have Marina Vitale representing their organisation as a guest speaker. She was joined by Gabrielle Turner, Ashleigh Quilty & Troy Mewburn, Customer Advisors with WorkCover Queensland.

Marina said statistics from WorkCover Queensland reveal that muscular skeletal injuries account for 42% of reported injuries and of these, 33% are back injuries. While we all age, the state that our bodies are in, combined with accumulated injuries incurred every day for years, impacts the nature of workplace injuries.

Factors that are important for managing injury risk include:

  • Where you work
  • Manual task risk
  • What you do
  • How you work

Tools workers can use to prevent injury include:

  • Weight management
  • Quit smoking
  • Drink sufficient water
  • Sleep and eat well
  • Manage health conditions

Employers should use prevention tools such as:

  • Encouraging employees to report niggles early
  • Walk the talk – lead by action and example
  • Refer to the Hazardous Manual Task Code of Practice 2011
  • Review SOP’s – how things are done should be aligned with the Code
  • Conduct ergonomic analysis
  • Use PErforM – a collaborative approach to manage task risk in the workplace (the regulator promotes training in this area)
  • Train supervisors specifically on return to work and muscular skeletal anatomy
  • Proactively manage older worker issues
  • Offer early intervention services
  • Utilise Job Access and Job in Jeopardy programs (these are Commonwealth funded programs lasting 6 months providing access to an exercise physiologist and GP care through Centrelink)

Physiotherapists can assist by:

  • Improving health and wellness
  • Conduct worksite visits
  • Demonstrating exercises for improving balance/pelvic floor – important part of core strength
  • Providing functional capacity evaluations
  • Conducting fitness for work assessments
  • Conducting pre-employment assessments
  • Providing Suitable Duties and Return to Work services.

Workers can manage muscular skeletal discomfort by:

  • Avoiding overreaching
  • Using mechanical assistance where possible
  • Maintaining tools – keep these sharp etc. so no pushing required
  • Be conscious of hand tool design
  • Keeping neutral positions for power and stability
  • Avoiding awkward postures
  • Avoiding ill fitting shoes

The following factors which affect worker recovery rates:

  • Not reporting early
  • Not receiving treatment early
  • Not receiving the correct treatment
  • Inappropriate duties being assigned on return to work

Marina finished her presentation by demonstrating some stretches that can be incorporated into the workplace.

Gabrielle Turner, Ashleigh Quilty & Troy Mewburn (Customer Advisors) then spoke about how WorkCover Queensland can  help business by identifying trends, assisting with the return to work process, injury prevention management (IPaM), information campaigns and access to industry resources.

The construction industry had 9,620 claims costing $116 million and required 35 days off work on average  – 42% of these were muscular-skeletal 33% were classified as lacerations and burns. Consulting Workcover Queensland to promote a safe work environment can result in lower injuries and reduced premiums.

Potential flags that claims are escalating:

  • Claimants not engaging with the business
  • Focussing on pain rather than using positive language
  • Poor support network
  • Claimants becoming withdrawn from social activities
  • Longer recoveries
  • Struggling with performance

Proactive employers display the following:

  • Early return to work from claimants
  • Keep in contact with the claimant
  • Invite claimants to work social functions
  • Educate employees on the return to work process
  • Have employee assistance programs (counselling) available
  • Ensure claimant’s colleagues are aware of their alternative duties

To find out more about CTC’s Safety Series Seminars, call us on 07 3216 6711 or visit our website.


Scaffolding In the Spotlight at CTC

IMGP2232A turnout of 62 people from numerous stakeholder groups attended CTC’s recent Safety Series Seminar on Wednesday, 26th August 2015.

This free seminar, as with previous seminars in the series, focused on a high risk activity, discussing the topic of scaffolding.

Two industry experts, Stuart Davis and Warren Reddicliffe gave their insight into scaffolding at the event.

The first presenter was Stuart Davis from Workplace Health and Safety Queensland, who discussed the importance of safety when working with scaffolding, and how to maintain safety when on the job.

He talked about how scaffolding is a temporary structure and needed to be treated as such when working.

He mentioned that single elements are the biggest cause of fatalities in scaffolding, including:

  • Hop up brackets
  • Overlapped platforms
  • Insert type anchor ties

Stuart also talked about the use of harnesses in scaffolding. He emphasized that harnesses are not required if scaffolding is done progressively, but are required on hung scaffolding.  He also said that although the law states harnesses are not required, if a company policy indicates harness use, there is no issue.

Stuart made special mention of how anchor insert ties are being used too early in green concrete, resulting in poor retention of the anchor.

Stuart’s last topic was about why stair modules drop out. He stated there are a few reasons such as weld failure, stair modules not being square to the transom and fatigue to the steel. He announced that Workplace Health & Safety Queensland will issue an alert on the matter soon.

Stuart’s segment was followed by a talk from Warren Reddicliffe, who oversees all of the QuickAlly business and engineering. He is a leader in the industry for both product knowledge and industry regulation.

He revealed that there have been many improvements in scaffolding, including the use of robotic welding.

Warren discussed the advantages and disadvantages of using aluminium in scaffolding. He said that:

  • In 2014  30% of all scaffolding sold in Australia was aluminium
  • Aluminium is one-third weaker than steel
  • Aluminium is more efficient than steel
  • Aluminium is more beneficial to worker’s health and safety
  • A 3 metre standard in aluminium is 7 kg while steel is 16.5 kg, making aluminum much easier to work with
  • Aluminium is not recommended for demolition work
  • Mixing and matching of couplers is not recommended as steel is usually 48mm and aluminium is 50mm which could lead to crushing the tube
  • Aluminium does have some steel components, such as the end fittings, which can rust
  • Always check for wear
  • Check loadings for different size transoms and ledgers
  • Polypropylene platforms are a new addition and have a lifespan of about 10 years
  • Ignorance is no excuse in law should an investigation come about after an incident

“Our Safety Series Seminars this year have been a great success”, commented CTC Training Enterprise Manager Peter Walker.

“The scaffolding seminar is no exception and we look forward to offering more seminars in the series in the months ahead”, he added.

“We surveyed participants to gauge their preference for future topics, and we will take this on board to deliver seminars that are relevant and beneficial to industry”.

Visit Hot Leasing to learn about CTC’s state of the art high risk work licence and safety training facilities.


CTC to host a free safety seminar about heights and rope access

Falling from heights is the leading cause of death in the construction industry. It’s three times more common in construction than in any other industry, with 1.03 deaths per 100,000 workers. In addition to the high number of fatalities due to falls, each day, 21 workers lodged a workers’ compensation claim for a falls-related injury and required one or more weeks off work, across all industries Australia-wide, according to Safe Work Australia’s report Work related injuries and fatalities involving a fall from height.

The Construction Training Centre CEO Phil Diver said it was for this reason that the Centre chose heights and rope access as the topic for their next Safety Series Seminar.

“We’ve hosted two seminars already which focused on the important issues of Swing Stage Safety and Elevated Work Platform Safety”, Phil said.

“Falling from heights is a huge risk with potentially devastating consequences, so it’s important that anyone involved in any working at height activity understands the dangers”.

“Seminar attendees will hear industry experts explain the dangers associated with rope access and heights work, hear about the latest advancements in height safety equipment and learn the critical steps an operator must take to reduce the likelihood of potentially deadly falls or equipment failure,” he added.

This event has been endorsed by the Working at Height Association, the peak industry body representing the interests of all those involved in providing products, services or advice relating to safe working at height.

Industry experts from the Working at Height Association (WAHA), the Australian Rope Access Association (ARAA) and RTO’s delivering training in heights and rope access will share their knowledge and lead a panel discussion at this free event.

Representatives from small and large construction companies, unions, government, industry organisations, equipment suppliers, entertainment venues and registered training organisations are expected to attend.

“The event is vital for business owners and contractors to understand their workplace health and safety obligations and to learn what to look out for when they engage heights and rope access technicians”.

“These seminars are free.  It’s how we give back to industry and attendees can see first-hand what CTC’s cutting edge Hot Leasing facilities have to offer in working at heights and other safety training”, Phil added.

The CTC Safety Series Seminar, which includes a light breakfast, will be held on Wednesday 27th May from 7:00am to 8:30am.

To register, click here or to find out more information, contact info@ctc.qld.edu.au or phone on 3216 6711 before 22nd May.

To learn more about CTC’s Hot Leasing training facilities visit www.hotleasing.com.au.